L’équarrissage du bois (Hewing)

De nombreux de hache à venir.

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Et en laissant le travail à la main derrière pour l’instant.

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Je me trouve dans un pays, il semble qu’il peut y avoir un ou deux collègues qui partagent le même choix que moi dans les chaussures en bois.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERARetarder le voyage sur la route, mais dans un sens, je peux comprendre étant donné les circonstances.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAPourtant, je pouvais voir que nous étions sur la bonne voie.

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Parking difficile il sur les Champs Elysées.

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Arriving at our lodging that night at the at the end of a two-track dead end dirt road.

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Il était clair que le lendemain, quand nous avons eu un regard sur les perspectives y avait beaucoup de travail à faire.

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Le jour où les préparatifs se sont bien déroulés.

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Pour nous et pour nos collègues

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Nous crantée bien

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…and we juggled.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

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Contestait avec le Quercus locale.

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La météo coopérant pas mieux que notre matériel.

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERANous étions tous dans le même cependant.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A la fin des travaux nous toutes les bières partagées que Bernard dit de ses nouvelles aventures.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Sur le chemin du retour, nous avons pris Paris par les talons,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAet fait signe à des camarades plus urbanisées.

Un grand merci à Cécile, pour prendre des photos, la société Google pour la traduction, mais surtout à Marc et surtout à Bernard.

B.D.S.

Ernest

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4 thoughts on “L’équarrissage du bois (Hewing)

    1. Thanks Graeme, I understand but if you don’t mind, and in light of the comparison, maybe it’s a chance to get specific about the work we did down there in France.

      The wood of course was a determining factor with all its imperfections and demands. That said if we look back this is the material at hand there in the region and it is what became the building material used, (so I included pictures of building construction for that context), imposing another standard on our material would have been wrong. It would negate our whole purpose and the choice of working with the axe regardless of how much we might have wished our oak was flawless, or else turned our effort into nothing more than kitsch.

      Tools: On the other hand our tools were in no way connected to the region much less our techniques of preparation, lay-out and reducing the wood. The axes you can see we are using though, do come close to representing, in the surface character they leave, the methods and choices that seemed typical of the region and it is also what was asked for by the one who provided the wood.

      Show: On top of this all we were out in front of crowds of spectators, on the town square, mostly for the provision of entertainment. There was a lot of improvisation which is apparent if you look closely – or maybe not even so closely – at the pictures. So our purposes were mostly having fun.

      Sorry Graeme I didn’t mean to read more into what you say than was intended and I don’t wish to justify anything, only to help with what is maybe some absent clarity.

      Regards,

      Ernest

  1. You are welcome but perhaps my ‘Blue Oak’ comment was too obtuse. I think I have seen you there ( http://blueoakblog.wordpress.com/2014/07/27/playing-marbles/ ) and meant only to compare the blog style and sense of being drawn along on the journey. Not a comment on hewing or anything related to the craft.
    Even so it is nice to have the embellishment of why the work was approached this way. I assume the ‘Journeyman’ carpenter was throughout Europe so there must have been work done with tools and methods not of the local region in the past. Consider yourself a Journeyman!

    1. Yes, I read it initially as you intended. An apprentice will work with the master carpenter until the point all the skills that one has to offer are gained. At such a time the apprentice is required to leave and find a position with another master in some other region. The process lasts for 10 years, giving the apprentice time to journey widely and gain a sense of all the regions across the country, and these days even abroad, and is known as the Tour de France. Of course much work, and maybe even the most beautiful of the work in a sense, was done by “unskilled” carpenters using a local, mostly rural vernacular which was never formalized but passed on in a modest and direct way. I like to fashion my own work after this last way of learning and feel a particular attachment to this kind of work when I see it.

      The blacksmiths had a keen interest in some of the different axes there, even in the barking spud made up for me by Burrell out in England. I was glad because I had taken along one particular axe that was needing to be re-laid and one of them has agreed to do the work. A good example of how knowledge travels and gets passed around.

      E.DB.

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